Raphaël Neal - La Capture (Jean)
Raphaël Neal
La Capture (Jean)
Type C-Print Color Photograph
2004
23 1/4 x 16 inches

Signed lower right corner on verso. Edition of 7

Raphaël Neal - Véra-Passion (Julie-Marie Parmentier & Jean)
Raphaël Neal
Véra-Passion (Julie-Marie Parmentier & Jean)
Type C-Print Color Photograph
2005
29 1/2 x 20 inches

Signed lower right corner on verso. Edition of 7

Raphaël Neal - A Boy's Room #4 (Boy with Bird)
Raphaël Neal
A Boy's Room #4 (Boy with Bird)
Type C-Print Color Photograph
2001, Printed 2009
20 x 29 1/2 inches

Signed lower right corner on verso. Edition of 3.

Arthur Rothstein - Flood Refugee, Missouri
Arthur Rothstein
Flood Refugee, Missouri
Silver Gelatin Photograph
c. 1937-1938
14 x 11 inches

Captioned and dated on verso. Estate stamp, from the collection of Grace Rothstein on verso.

Arthur Rothstein - Darrel Coble, Son of Farmer in Dust Bowl, Cimarron, Oklahoma
Arthur Rothstein
Darrel Coble, Son of Farmer in Dust Bowl Area, Cimarron County, Oklahoma
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1936
14 x 11 inches

Captioned and dated on verso. Arthur Rothstein collection stamp and Estate stamp, from the collection of Grace Rothstein on verso.

21 & Under

Susan Sontag wrote in, On Photography, "Photography is an elegiac art, a twilight art. Most subjects photographed are, just by virtue of being photographed, touched with pathos….All photographs are momenti mori. To take a photograph is to participate in another persons mortality, vulnerability, mutability."

"21 & Under" presents a wide array of photographs of those still young and formative. The pictures range from the 1930's to the present. The exhibition profiles classic photographers who have taken a documentary approach to their subjects as well as contemporary artists who use photography to either create narratives or stage subjective realities.

In "21 & Under" photography can be seen as a form of nostalgia. As the viewer ages we question whether we long for an earlier time, or do we romanticize youth and our memory constructs of earlier days? Through viewing the pictures we are transported into a timeless place and use the margins of the photograph to bracket experience. The images can function both as evidence of a reality that existed or be seen as windows to an inner dimensions. Even though our viewing is always in the present the pictures are seen as a kind of evidence that something has happened. Life exists as a flow of time, but photography freezes time. Reality is fragmented through the act of photography. The making and readings of photographs are both acts of a different form of observation. In the constructed realities of contemporary photographers the particular subject stays personal. In classic documentary photography, which was less often staged, the particular can be viewed as symbolic of the universal.