Henri Cartier-Bresson - Behind the Gare St. Lazare
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Behind the Gare St. Lazare
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1932, printed 1980s
14 1/8 x 9 5/8 inches

Cartier-Bresson's signature, in ink, on recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson, Seville
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Seville (boy, shadows)
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1933, Printed circa 1980
9 1/2 x 14 1/4 inches

Cartier-Bresson's signature, in ink, on recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Henri Matisse, Vence, France
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Henri Matisse, Vence, France
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1944, printed circa 1970
image: 11 7/8 x 17 3/4 inches, paper 15 3/4 x 19 3/4 inches

Cartier-Bresson's signature, in ink, on recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Barge Family, Bougival, France
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Barge Family, Bougival, France
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1956, printed c. 1980s
14 x 9 1/2 inches

Signed in ink in the lower recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Siphnos, Greece (Girl on Stairs)
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Siphnos, Greece (Girl on Stairs)
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1961, printed Later
9 1/2 x 14 1/4 inches

Signed in ink by Cartier-Bresson on recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Italy, Abruzze, Village of Aquila
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Italy, Abruzze, Village of Aquila
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1951, Printed 1980s
9 1/2 x 6 3/8 inches

Titled and artist's copyright stamp on verso.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Seville
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Seville
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1933
11 x 14 inches

Signed in pen on print lower right.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - New Orleans
Henri Cartier-Bresson
New Orleans
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1947
11 x 14 inches
Signed lower right on recto
Henri Cartier-Bresson| Three Juveniles, Montreal, Canada
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Three Juveniles, Montreal, Canada
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1964
9 1/2 x 14 1/4 Inches

Signed in ink lower right margin recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Picnic on the Banks of the Marne
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Picnic on the Banks of the Marne
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1938, Printed Later
Image Size: 11 3/4 x 17 1/2, Paper Size: 15 5/8 x 19 1/2 inches

Signed in margin on lower right recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Naples, Italy
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Naples, Italy
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1960, Printed 1980s
11 3/4 x 15 3/4 inches, Image size 9 1/2 x 14 1/4 inches

Cartier-Bresson's signature, in ink, and his embossed copyright stamp on recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Tennessee
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Tennessee
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1947
11 x 14 inches
Signed lower right
Henri Cartier-Bresson - Cape Cod Woman on the Fourth of July, Massachussetts
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Cape Cod Woman on the Fourth of July, Massachussetts
Silver Gelatin Photograph
c. 1947, Printed c. 1970
11 3/4 x 7 7/8 inches

both the sheet and the image, with Cartier-Bresson's hand stamp, three Time Inc. hand stamps, including "Used in TIME-LIFE Book Photography," and other notations, in pencil and in ink, on verso.

Henri Cartier-Bresson - Srinagar, Kashmir
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Srinagar, Kashmir
Silver Gelatin Photograph
1948, Printed Later
16 X 20 Inches Paper, 11 5/8 X 17 1/4 Inches Image

Cartier-Bresson's signature, in ink, and artist's embossed copyright stamp on recto.

Henri Cartier-Bresson is one of the most original, accomplished, influential, and beloved figures in the history of photography. The son of a wealthy textile merchant, Cartier-Bresson studied painting at André Lhote's academy in Montparnasse in 1927, and soon thereafter entered the bohemian world of the Parisian avant-garde. In 1931, he began to use a camera and to make photographs that reveal the influence of both Cubism and Surrealism: bold, flat planes, collage-like compositions, and spatial ambiguity as well as an affinity for society's outcasts and the back alleys where they lived and worked. Within a year, he had mastered the miniature 35mm Leica camera and had begun traveling in Italy, Spain, Morocco, and Mexico, developing what would become one of the hallmarks of twentieth century photographic style. Although he was influenced by such photographers as Eugène Atget and André Kertész, his photographic fusion of form and content was groundbreaking. In his 1952 landmark monograph "The Decisive Moment," he defined his philosophy: "To me, photography is the simultaneous recognition, in a fraction of a second, of the significance of an event as well as of a precise organization of forms which gave that event its proper expression."

Cartier-Bresson was drafted into the French army in 1940. He was taken prisoner by the Germans, but escaped on his third attempt and joined the French Resistance. In 1946, he assisted in the preparation of a "posthumous" show of his work organized by the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the mistaken belief that he had been killed in the war. The following year he founded the Magnum photo agency with Robert Capa, David "Chim" Seymour, and others. He spent the next twenty years on assignment, documenting the great upheavals in India and China, and also traveling to the Soviet Union, Cuba, Canada, Japan, and Mexico. He left Magnum in 1966 and then devoted himself primarily to painting and drawing until his death in 2004.

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